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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 493 (some duplicates have been removed)
's a circus you want to go to. >> it's crazy to see. >>> and a wild turkey keeps a close eye on a turkey hunt err. >> oh! >> you got to be kidding me. >> we're getting things started with a video that's a little difficult to watch. it's coming out of russia, take a look at this. what you're seeing is a man walking on an eight-story balcony, according to reports. many reports say that this man was actually under the influence. some kind of drugs or alcohol. >> what does he have in his system that gives him a death wish like this? >> keep watching the video. this is going to take a turn for the worse. notice when the camera pans down, there are emergency workers already on the scene. >> oh no! >> oh, man, that's bad. >> you see people immediately run to his aid. reports say that he was alive and conscious after this fall. emergency responders did administer first aid on the scene and he was transported to an area hospital. and again -- according to reports, was conscious. >> i'm going to guess that he had to have broken both of his legs. went down feet first and there's bones. ouant that withou
of turkey. >> turkey and israel relations are very important for the whole region, because the region itself is going through a historical transformation process, like egypt, tunisia, yemen are trying to change, and also syria is in a very, very difficult situation. >> and the last thi that you would nt to see in the region is the turkish and israel relations getting worse. >> rose: american foreign policy, and turkish foreign policy when we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following. >> rose: additional funding provided by these funders. n't and by bloomberg, a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. >> from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: richard haass is here, she the president of the council on foreign relations. he is a veteran observer of american foreign policy in his new book he looks inward and argues america must solve its domestic problems if it is going to be a foreign power, it is foreign policy begins as home, the case for putting america's house in order. i am pleased to have him here at this table.
, we talked to the prime minister of turkey, to the former prime minister of italy, monty, they talk about he was a guy they loved to talk about foreign policy and he was curious and interested. >> absolutely. i was just in turkey last week and i it is clear the use and ts turkish leadership, the president, the prime minister and the rest there like this president, like talking with him, how could presidents not like foreign policy, quite honestly in the united states is has this unique position in the world for all of our -- >> rose: having to go through congress -- >> in second term you don't have to legislate foreign policy you have much more discretion in the united states as commander in chief as legislator. >> rose: primarily domestic. >> but in order to achieve that you have to also keep foreign policy to some extent at bay. you can't have a world that is unravelling. and be able to shift your focus as much as the president may want to to things domestic. >> george bush, when he came to office, if there had been no 9/11, if there had been no decision later to invade not afghan
to avoid antagonizing pyongyang. the u.s. secretary of state visits turkey for the third time in two weeks. passing the taste test. new regulations some are fighting hard to swallow. -- finding hard to swallow. and international donors conference is underway to help the troubled darfur region. the goal is to raise billions of dollars to rebuild the area. fighting broke out in march 2003 between the rebels and the government forces. since then, more than 200,000 people have been killed. 7.5population is about million. the united nations estimates about 2 million have been displaced because of continued fighting. that is almost 1/3 of the population. 1.4 million live in camps set up by international relief organizations. an estimated 200,000 refugees live in camps in chad. darfur.oks like the same soil and trees. nothis refugee, this is home. it never will be. is bitter. the minute security is restored, that is our country and we're throwing back. up to now, there is no security. there is fighting and air strikes. our people are being punished and the world is silent. how can we return? over
put his pecker in my mouth. okay, okay. shoot it. what? i'm not shooting this turkey! killing innocent animals is wrong. no animals are innocent. they're all guilty of something. besides, you eat turkey all the time. that's turkey the food. this is turkey the animal. benjamin franklin thought turkeys were so noble, he suggested they be america's national bird. benjamin franklin was an atheist pedophile who flew kites to meet children. that's why god struck him with lightning. i won't do it! no! (gobbling) mama! mama! this is it! over here! rallo, what is this i let you wake me up and drive me down here for? the thanksgiving day parade float registration! come on, mama. i've been talking about this since febu... febra... since before march. um, are y'all here for the, um, thanksgiving float registration? yeah, give us that clipboard, you burnout. and forget everything you know about floats. 'cause ours will be the cadillac of the 1970s of floats. it's gonna be the kind of float that when it goes by, people say, "huh, look at that float. oh, here comes another one." everyone's sitting wi
northbound direction. >> ground turkey is considered a healthy alternate to ground beef and ahead seven-day outlook and "consumer reports" reveal a danger you should be aware of. >> amanda knocks sits down with diane sawyer and what she is revealing about facing a new trial in italy. >> the european countries saying goodbye to the monarch it has known for 30 years and how >> covering santa clara, san francisco, east bay, and all the bay area, this is abc7 news. >> tuesday morning you are looking at a gorgeous picture of the bay looking eastward with the sun rising and this is going to be another hot day today and when you add the dry and windy conditions we are looking at high fire danger tonight and our meteorologist will talk about the exact time line and which areas are most at risk. >> for the first time in 123 years, the netherlands has a king. queen beatrix ended her 33 years and her eldest son william-alexander is now the king. thousands of people gathered outside the palace to celebrate the hand over of power. >> only on abc7 news we are hearing from amanda knocks -- knox the yo
, a consumer alert about what could be in your ground turkey. reveals the meat that some consider to be a healthier choice can also be a breeding ground for antibuy yours antibiotic resistant bacteria. >> i make meat balls. >> i will use turkey for any recipe that calls for beef. >> but a consumer report investigation shows that when you're talking turkey, you could be getting more than you bargained for. overall, 90% of the samples had one or more of the five bacteria we looked for, adding to that was the fact that most of these bacteria proved resistant to antibiotics. >> consumer reports shipped 257 samples of ground turkey to an outside lab. the scientists created a broth with each sample to analyze. more than half of the samples tested positive for the fecal contaminants. the majority were resistant to multiple antibiotics. >> some of these bacteria can cause food poisoning and many infections. the good news is, we found less antibiotic from turkeys raised without antibiotics. >> that was once touted as a great innovation to promote gr
. >> i'm michael finney. we team up with consumer reports on an investigation into ground turkey. dangers you need to be aware >>> we begin with a hunt for a possible accomplice in the boston marathon bombings. >> a dozen people are now considered to be persons of interest in this case. a u.s. official tells abc news they're trying to figure out whether this man may have chatted with tammerlan tsarnaev before the attacks. >> he was later killed during a raid by authorities. in a news conference, the president said officials are setting history aside to cooperate with the investigation. >> there are still suspicions sometimes between intelligence and law enforcement agencies that they back 10, 20, 30 years but they're improving. >> one fingerprint has been disskpufrd investigators are working to find a match to that print and of 260 people injured only 20 remain in the hospital. none in critical condition, one survivor shared a story today. >> and he he says yeah, there is worse out here than you. and that is when i remembered my friends and i said oh, my god, my friends, my friends are al
republic -- held villages are digging up the past. and turkey -- how to do business with facial hair. in a few days, a long-awaited trial will open in germany. the trial against the last surviving member of a neo-nazi cell known as the nsu. a year-and-a-half ago when their crimes came to light, it sent shock waves across the country. nenazi had been killing foreigners on german soil for almost 10 years while german authorities followed false leads. now authorities hope to avoid making more mistakes at the trial starting next week in munich, but there is already criticism. the court room is too small with room for just 50 observers and 50 journalists. the seats were allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. the problem -- no turkish media outlets got seats. they are angry, not least because eight of the nsu's 10 victims were of turkish origin. >> the correspondent for turkey's largest daily newspaper in germany made a special trip to munich to pick at his accreditation to attend the trial for a key member of the so-called nationalist -- national socialist underground and four all
. fleet week got involved with a humanitarian mission back in october in the earthquake in van, turkey. there's a heavy kurdish in san francisco and the ... better recover from their event and how to better prepare in the future from the katz traufk event that had taken place would not occur. we got a phone call at the fleet week association to ask if we could help bring together some resources and leet a fact-finding mission and we did that. one of our panelists is up here, second from your left, rob dudgeon, he's with the department of emergency management and he's the director of emergency services. rob's organization has been instrumental in creating the program that we have from back in 2010 all the way through to today and i know in the future we're already talking about putting together a hot wash of everything we've learned through 2012's fleet week. so rob is going to talk about the van, turkey mission. from turkey we have rear admiral guereva he has more than 14 years sea-going experience serving across various frigates. he assumed command of the suband joint command, ch
next turkey sandwich. why could have bacteria that even antibiotics can help. stay with us. at a dry cleaner, we replaced people with a machine. what? customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk to a real person 24/7, you need an ally. hello? ally bank. your money needs an ally. ry logical thinker. (laughs) i'm telling you right now, the girl back at home would absolutely not have taken a zip line in the jungle. (screams) i'm really glad that girl stayed at home. vo: expedia helps 30 million travelers a month find what they're looking for. one traveler at a time. expedia. find yours. gerri: put down your fork. what these antibiotic resistant bugs me for your health coming up next gerri: our nations brave men and women coming home to a tough economy companies have trained or hired 290,000 veterans and military individuals. nearly triple the original goal. that is good news. she'll obama is asking companies to hire 435,000 over the next five years. wal-mart, ups, home depot, blackstone group, target and mcdonald's have all committed
large amounts of caffeine. >>> i'm liz crenshaw, a new study looking at the safety of ground turkey. results of the study and what you can do to protect your family coming up. >>> and we're looking at rain across the area right now. storm team 4 radar showing the rain all across the region. we'll show you when the sun may . >>> aaron gilchrist is on the live desk right now with news just in from the fda. >> reporter: yeah, jim, going through the statement from the fda saying it approved plan b step one, emergency contraception for 15-year-old girls without a prescription. the statement saying it will be over-the-counter. we're talking about the morning after pill and you won't need a prescription for this. and it is for girls, anyone over 15 with proof of age at the point of sale. the fda saying part of the statement that women 15 years old or older are able to understand how plan b one step works and how to use it properly in saying that they are now going to make it available for anyone 15 years old or older. the latest from the live desk, back to you. >>> there are also new conce
. nine different codes for being injured by a turkey. >> that is correct. whether you run into a turkey or the turkey runs into you, you are pecked by the turkey or you are bitten by a turkey. there's a difference between being pecked and being bitten. >> they have nine codes for turkeys. >> they have about 5 codes for basketball. you get hit by a basketball or you are a second offend error third offender by a basketball. or do you have a -- i don't know what the medical term is, a condition where you are alter being hit by a basketball. doctors have to figure this out, put the number in, the indig get number, to check that number to make sure they have -- >> codes are even long. w 6161 xa. they don't memorize this stuff. >> no, they have a code book. they are going to get one a lot bigger than that. they have to look it up under the code book. i don't know. do you look under turkey? >> you are the king of all congress. >> i think what the regulators and regulations need to make some sense. what is the purpose? what is the goal? of course doctors need to be accurate in their diagnosis b
that. i wish i could say that the small graup of us went to van, turkey, and did something heroic and changed their lives. i really can't say that. but i can say they changed ours. the lessons we brought back from there will benefit our greater community more than i ever thought would be the case when we detarted. to go back and start a little bit at the beginning of how this even came to pass because it's typically not a mission of a city to go to an international destination. we've got a state department, we've got the military, we've got a lot of organizations at the federal level that do this all the time. so it seems a little bit of a one-off for a city to be involved. but when i say it's a story of people and a story of community, it really does start right there. last halloween, so we're talking on the eve of -- in the aftermath of fleet week, as it were, october is a really busy month for us here in san francisco. it starts off with fleet week and it ends with halloween so it's two cresendo events. last halloween diana who you see running around here, key to the org
we started talking to the owner and he said, oh, did you hear about the earthquake in turkey? well, we'd heard about it the way everybody heard about it, i think it got about two minutes on some of the cable news channels, and that was it. there wasn't a lot of coverage on the van earthquake. it just didn't hit the air waves that much. he said, oh, my family's there. and he started talking about the devastation and exactly what the impact was. they were friends with the mayor of van and the mayor had asked them because they were in san francisco if there was a way they could get san francisco to help them and he was trying to get a meeting with the mayor to express this concern and make a request. i said, well, interestingly enough, we could probably help you with that because we do have a bit of a connection with the mayor's office. but the first thing we need, we need a letter, we need something official. i mean, i'm just an old paramedic, i have to ask, right? within 24 hours we had a letter. and this was the first hint of what we were going to see when we got there about
camp on the border with turkey. the camp opened in september. 26,000 people live here under the control of anti-government forces. 10,000 refugees appeared in the past two months. >> there has been a lot of death. the government hits the village once per week. in the end, it was consistent. take a 10 days would go by and we could not get food or water. >> they would look out for rockets. when they sell the light, they would tell us, and we would hide. >> the long, hot summer is coming. 40 degrees celsius here. doctors are dreading the months ahead. allah said the heat and open sewers create an environment for mosquito-borne diseases and are already short on medical supplies. a thriving market is starting up. no one has left here for turkey in the past four-five months because turkey does not have the capacity to absorb the refugees from here. for thousands of syrians, this is now home. >> life is not good anymore. we had everything. here we have nothing. the food, water, gas. not even a mattress to sleep on. 3.6 million people have been internally displaced in syria by the fighting acco
. here's what's coming up in today's show. turkey -- the changing role of women. italy -- how the political deadlock is threatening business. and ukraine -- why tanks are the new fast cars. for many, the poisonous element r a cynic is forever connected with famous crime writer agatha christie. she loved to write about treacherous women who killed people by adding are sick to their food. that fiction became reality in eastern hungary. in a spectacular murder series, several women kill their husbands with arsenic. th were discovered and sentenced, but today the region is dealing with our sec again, albeit for a completely different reason. >> some 160 men who died of arsenic poisoning live buried in cemeteries. most were killed by their wives in the years following world war i. women known as angel makers got our senate from pesticides, usually from flypaper. the merger international attention. two women were executed and numerous others sentenced to life in prison. today are sick is once again making headlines in the same region. nicolette lives here, but until recently, she ha
. >> these of the closing chapters turkey'sas been called greatest road. the prosecution has finished its case against the defenders of alleged to have the numbers of a shadowy group plotting to destabilize the turkish state. six the case first started years ago, most turks were in favor of a. they thought it a necessary reckoning with the past. of those arrested were members of the turkish military. as the case developed, more people have been ensnared including academics, journalists, politicians, and now members of the military standing trial. the opponents of the case now say it is being used by the ruling party to stamp out any opposition to them. -- an islamicc party that has been in power for 10 years. protestors fear the secular foundations of turkey are being threatened by the trial and the government is using it to silence its opponents. the prime minister would argue this trial is bringing stability to turkey. 1 areg kong and tie setting a precautionary measures against a new strain of bird flu. they have been spraying disinfectant into markets. they have sterilized more than 100 booths sin
their policies. a newspaper in turkey is suing for access to the court room. >> turkish newspapers are unwilling to accept that they have been shut out of the court room and are now planning to appeal to germany's highest court. eight of the victims were of turkish origin. that is why they believe they have the -- that is what the turkish government believes they have the right to present at the trial. >> what is happening is being followed closely in turkey. it does not look good. first, because it excluded the ambassador and now turkish media. that is hard to explain. our readers expect us to be present and to report the story. >> but the court says it allocated the 50 seats reserved for the press fairly, on a first-come, first-served basis. for the trial of the main defendant, the court says the turkish media applied too late. turkey's ambassador called for the court to show more understanding for the problem. >> this matter needs to be handled with a little more sensitivity. after all, eight turkish residents of germany were murdered, and it is completely natural that the turkish press is in
some other examples. nine different codes for being injured by turkey. >> that is correct. whether you're ready to attack your the turkey wrensen to you, you are packed by turkey or bitten by turkey. there's a difference between being pac-10 didn't. nine coats for turkey's. they have about five codes for basketball. you hit by a basketball, a second offender, a third offender being hit by a basketball, or do you have -- i don't know what the medical service, a condition where you are always being hit by a basketball. so doctors have to figure this out. but the number and, the ten digit number and check that this is, that number to make sure that they have -- john: the codes are even longer. w6161 x eight. they don't memorize this stuff. >> they have a code book. it will you well appear that one. they have to look it up in the code book. you look under turkey or what you run into, basketball. john: so we do have them do? you are king, king of all congress. >> i think what the regulators and regulations need to make some sense. what is the purpose? was a goal? of course doctors need to b
into turkey, and escape from the slaughter of civil war. but for many syrians there is no way out and here at bab al hawa, in idlib province, thousands live in a squalid makeshift camp within sight of the border and refuge. videojournalist ted nieters traveled to syria for the "newshour" and found seven thousand people huddled by the frontier. syrian air force fighter jets overflew the camp, and sent its shellshocked residents scurrying. nawaf al moussa came from the countryside of idlib. >> ( translated ): it's not safe at all because at the moment the aircraft are over the camp. everyday there is the sound of aircraft because aleppo, which is 30 kilometers from here, there is war there. we're not fighters. we came here to feel safe, because we are civilians. >> sreenivasan: the united nations refugee office says two years of upheaval have uprooted at least four million syrians. that's about one-fifth of the entire population. more than one million have fled to neighboring nations; more than 300,000 are in lebanon; a similar number in jordan; nearly 200,000 are in turkey and 100,000-plus
turkey. van is the largest settlement in eastern turkey. at that time its peak it had about 700,000 people in it during the summer. beautiful like, absolutely gorgeous place to be. after the earthquake everybody who could leave, did. so what you have left are those that are either die-hards, the people that are the leaders of the community that want to rebuild, or people that couldn't leave. and that's really telling because when you look at these pictures you're going to see abdomen abject poverty. that's not really what it was before the earthquake so it went from bad to worse for these people. but what you saw time and time again is they were out and rebuilding and carrying on and i think that says a lot about people in general and that's the next take away, is that no matter if you look at van turkey, you go to china, you go to india or you go to the united states, go up to the dakotas, you go to missouri, you go to joplin, what you find is that people are more resilient than we give them credit for being. people will will come out in their community and help themselve
different codes for being injured by turkey. >> that is correct. whether you're ready to attack your the turkey wrensen to you, you are packed by turkey or bitten by turkey. there's a difference between being pac-10 didn't. nine coats for turkey's. they have about five codes for basketball. you hit by a basketball, a second offender, a third offender being hit by a basketball, or do you have -- i don't know what the medical service, a condition where you are always being hit by a basketball. so doctors have to figure this out. but the number and, the ten digit number and check that this is, that number to make sure that they have -- john: the codes are even longer. w6161 x eight. they don't memorize this stuff. >> they have a code book. it will you well appear that one. they have to look it up in the code book. you look under turkey or what you run into, basketball. john: so we do have them do? you are king, king of all congress. >> i think what the regulators and regulations need to make some sense. what is the purpose? was a goal? of course doctors need to be accurate in their diag
met in turkey. the negotiations will resume on when thed saturday group will come together with iranian negotiators. as we look towards that, we are delighted here in this panel today to talk about how best to negotiate with iran and what does not work. we are delighted to have javier solana and carry sa - -gary samon. javier solana is a distinguished fellow at the brookings institute. he enjoyed a distinguished diplomatic career including spanish foreign minister, nato secretary general, and your opinion's representative for security policy. it was in that capacity that from 2004 until 2009 he led the european union effort in negotiating with iran. gary samon is executive director for research and harvard. from 2009 until early this year he was a special assistant to the president and white house coordinator for weapons of mass destruction, which meant he was at the central american policy on iran and have opportunities across the table from iranian negotiators. we will have opening comments from our two palace and then we look forward to questions. >> thank you very much
turkey to deploy military units south across the border. turkey would want a u.n. mandate for that, and it would want assistance from its nato allies. >> the u.n. now has contingency plans, but they all require endorsement by the security council. the violence inside syria has dragged on for more than two years, but everyone here knows there could be a decisive event that changes things on the grad and changes them very fast. ssad eventually falls, there is no security that the council, which has been deadlocked through the uprising, would agree to a new mission inside syria. even if it did, the discussions and debates and a vote are part of a normally slow-moving process. if there were to be a sudden change in syria, do not expect a swift u.n. response. at the united nations. >> an adviser to the libyan prime minister has been kidnapped on the outskirts of the capital. he was seized on sunday. it was thought his car was stopped at a state -- state checkpoint. no one has claimed responsibility. hundreds of protestors have rallied outside the embassy to remind them of people being h
, we will look at the troubled peace talks between turkey and kurdish rebels. >> be sure to keep it here. >> welcome back. >> thanks so much for staying with us. we started with the story -- the turkish government says it has set up a commission to help shape public opinion on the peace process with kurdish militants, following a call for a cease-fire last month by the leader of the kurdistan workers party. >> he urged pkk fighters to lay down their arms and withdraw from turkish soil, but the rebels want legal protection guaranteeing that they will not be attacked during their withdrawal. it is a demand so far rejected by ankara. >> it is estimated more than 30,000 people have died in the armed conflict between the pkk and turkey. >> there are hundreds of faces. the true number could be many thousands. kurds arrested by the turkish police and military and never seen again. her husband was one of them. he disappeared 18 years ago. a support group in istanbul has been her lifeline. >> the endless waiting and hoping made me sick. i would not wish that on anyone. that is why we need
-decade-long conflict that's claimed more than 40,000 rights here in turkey. for the first time there seems to be a real chance to feast there's time to be sent in prison and then another wants to create a more powerful presidency here in turkey that he may one day take, and he needs support of the kurds in parliament to implement the constitutional changes that would allow him to create that. >> a fourth person has now decide from a new strain of bird flu in china. he age 7 and age 9 strain of bird flu has been found. >> for doctors in shanghai the race is on to find out as much as they can about this new virus. where it comes from and how it spreads. >> as for the 2 h 7 and 9 bird flu virus we have discovered, up until now we are certain it's a new virus that has infected humans. as of now we're still unclear it is. at >> unlike the more vir lieutenant h 5 and h hearly something has happened to make it dead limit tighter controls have been put in place at hong kong's boardercrossing points looking for signs of a fever and by coincidence this month marks the 10th anniversary of the arrival of sars h
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 493 (some duplicates have been removed)